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Wednesday, May 22, 2007

self-portrait Wednesday

You are What You Eat Knit…

It’s the most wonderful time of the year! The Birds. The Flowers. The Sun.

I’ve been rousting around the house, searching out and making mounds of objects feeling the need to cast-off all extra baggage and start anew. Recycle. Donate. Bin.

Off the main bedroom is a huge walk-in closet.

I am NOT the type of person who should be given the keys to that particular kingdom.

There’s stuff in there.

There’s stuff in there I haven’t seen for seven years, not since the days I moved in in 2000, celebrating the beginning of a new millenium wishing for a new leaf and praying for a chance to abandon my hoarding ways. I must admit that nearly all of the things in the closet have been used and served me well; the fact remains they have mostly outlived their usefullness in my life. Some however, have never, cough, reached their potential.

Consider the hand-knit piece above.

It is a sweater back from so long ago that I don’t even know where the pattern could be found (hint: Rowan something or other to be sure). It is Intarsia. It is cotton. I plead temporary insanity.

Looking closer, I see why I might’ve been attracted to this devil-child. It has interesting alternating Stockinette / Reverse Stockinette blocks.


It has Pansies.


I think they’re Pansies.

And who wouldn’t love a Chartruese Daisy?

Certainly not me — hee — it appears that that could’ve been the Theme of this Poem in Stitches and, you know, I’ve recited that one all my life, to anyone who would listen. Lean. Green. Knitting Machine.

So, in the spirit of leaness, I invite you to a challenge: name the pattern and book this sweater is made from. TOO HARD Dudes! Instead — leave a suggested use for this block in the comments. What would YOU do with this intarsia *masterpiece*?

WIN 5 balls of Zitron POLO (a wonderful blend of 60% Cotton and 40% Microfiber) in a beautiful Cerise color and a pattern for a ChicKami shell!

Winner to be announced Monday, May 28, 2007! (Random number generator used to draw winner.)

75 Responses to “Wednesday, May 22, 2007”

  1. Gina H. says:

    I have no idea what pattern or book it came from. But could the piece be turned into a baby blanket? Or could it be converted into hand towels and/or dishcloths?

  2. Frank says:

    No clue about the pattern, but I think it would make a lovely pillow for a child’s room!

  3. Susan P says:

    WOW! Not that it is any of my business, but that’s a helluva lot of busy-ness! Checked my stock of back issues of Rowan books but this must be before my time. Good luck to other prize hunters.

  4. Jennifer says:

    I don’t know about the pattern, but I think that the swatch would make a lovely pillow.

  5. Jennifer says:

    I don’t know about the pattern, but I think that the swatch would make a lovely pillow.

  6. Wanda says:

    I doubt if I’ve been knitting that long to even have a Rowan pattern book from that long. It looks pretty, but cotton + intarsia should never mix! :-)

  7. Leslie says:

    It’s definitely screaming out Shasha Kagan, but I’m not sure about the pattern book yet…

  8. Cynthia says:

    I thought the contest was a jokey contest….but I see from the comments, you were serious. All I could think was the title of the pattern is, “A Flower Frenzy” and it came from the latest edition of the Crazy Lady Knits Collection- volume 2. I think it would make a lovely and fashionable bolster- with green fabric on the ends.

  9. Emily says:

    Dude, if I don’t have that exact pattern I certainly have its cousin! It’s gotta be Susan Duckworth or Sasha Kagan, circa 1992, but I don’t have Rowan magazines back that far. I just had a nice trip down memory lane though, looking through my Vogue magazines! I even found a couple of patterns that I want to knit! (Minus the 6″ ribbing around the bottom.)

  10. Sarah says:

    I have no idea where the pattern is from either. I think the “swatch” should be framed and called “Art.” Because it is.

  11. Patricia Carroll says:

    It might make a nice spring or summer purse or bag. Perhaps gathered at the sides and pulled together with nice handles.

  12. I would make it into a pillow and gift it to someone.

  13. Diana says:

    I was going to say baby blanket before I thought about the size of said ‘swatch.’ Still, perhaps a mini-blanket for a newborn. The colors and the sweetness of the motifs suggest baby things to me.

  14. Seanna Lea says:

    I liked the bolster idea, but now that it is taken you could sew down the flaps and use it to cover a tube-like box and store straight needles in it (like Art!). I feel like the idea is in my head and I need to diagram it out.

  15. Tracy H. says:

    Add a pastel-print lining, seam the sides together and the bottom closed, add a border & handles at the top and turn it into a tote bag.

  16. polly says:

    The pattern is Chequer Flowers by Sasha Kagan from Rowan Knitting Magazine #5.

    I vote for a small pillow, filled with a few sachet of dry lavender. Seems appropriate with the flower theme

  17. Deanna says:

    I like the baby blanket idea. Could you use this as the center panel for a quilt-add a matching fabric border.

  18. Debbie A says:

    Somehow I am envisioning this as a big slouchy bag, lined with a tiny flower print fabric in a muted pink or blue. Perfect for summer at the beach. (That is if I didn’t have to work all summer and could spend the summer at the beach.)

  19. Jennifer says:

    I vote for a baby blanket too. (None to original.) However, I would run two rows of tiny stitches all round the center rectangle (eliminating ribbing and armhole shaping). Then cut away those details. Using the background color I would pick up and knit a couple inches flat then add a lush ruffle–maybe five inches all around depending upon actual proportions. You could end the ruffle with a cast off row in the pretty chartreuse.

    The sewn seam could be cleverly covered by a pretty ribbon or a knitted facing. (There are some clever Rowan facings. I did one where you knit a few rows then join your knitting to your previously knitted fabric and continue knitting. After you finish off the ruffle you tack down the facing. Not too tough.)

    This of course, assumes that the back is lovely. If not, I vote for a cotton lined bag. You can never have enough bags for toting veggies home from the store.

  20. Jennifer says:

    I vote for a baby blanket too. (None to original.) However, I would run two rows of tiny stitches all round the center rectangle (eliminating ribbing and armhole shaping). Then cut away those details. Using the background color I would pick up and knit a couple inches flat then add a lush ruffle–maybe five inches all around depending upon actual proportions. You could end the ruffle with a cast off row in the pretty chartreuse.

    The sewn seam could be cleverly covered by a pretty ribbon or a knitted facing. (There are some clever Rowan facings. I did one where you knit a few rows then join your knitting to your previously knitted fabric and continue knitting. After you finish off the ruffle you tack down the facing. Not too tough.)

    This of course, assumes that the back is lovely. If not, I vote for a cotton lined bag. You can never have enough bags for toting veggies home from the store.

  21. Kim says:

    Summery purse – line it with fabric.

  22. Bana says:

    I think a cylindrical bolster pillow for sprucing up a wicker conservatory armchair with perhaps a contrasting (pansy purple) fabric on the edges or ends.

  23. Lesley says:

    I’m about the pillow – it has a kind of whimsy that would suit an enclosed porch, wicker furniture thing. I would back it with canvas, then take a nap!!

  24. Carey says:

    I would turn it into wall art. Keep it in sight, for a reminder of times gone by! (And, perhaps, to remind you to rethink project ideas before they reach the point of no return, and no desire to finish…)

  25. Crystal says:

    I also vote for baby blanket or summer tote bag. I think either would be super cute!

  26. Sydney says:

    I think it would make a cute baby blanket. I would remove the ribbing and everything from the start of the armhole shaping and above. Use what’s left as the center of a baby blanket. Otherwise, I would make it into a pillow.

  27. Brenda N says:

    Became obsessed to find which Rowan it came from! Gotta say, they do some amazing stuff, even if it is from their early days (I wouldn’t say THIS was their best effort….). My list of things to knit runneth over! I envision this as a small drawstring purse. A lovely soft pink (or the light blue satin lining with some I-cord tubes for the ties/handle.

  28. Cindy says:

    You could also use it as the center panel of a log cabin style blanket. If the outside blocks were made in colors that matched the flowers, it would help them to stand out nicely.

  29. Carol says:

    A summertime lapghan! Very pretty!

  30. I would make it into a pretty spring pillow cover for when you are aching for spring and Chicago isn’t ready to give it up yet. You could just look at the little flowers and know that spring is on the way.

  31. Nancy in A2 says:

    It has to be a bath mat.

  32. allie says:

    CUTE throw pillow that would be soft and cuddly. You could knit a back that matches the border color– plum purple. Good luck going through the closet, will we be seeing the other wonders you find soon?

  33. goodyoneshoe says:

    I gotta say that Nancy beat me to it: bathmat for sure! Or sew into U-shaped toilet “carpet”? (What were those, anyway, those Borgana “U”s? [made in Elkhorn, Wisconsin at the Borg plant!]. Eww: my toes curl to think on them, although they would be appreciative of cotton. Considering the labor that went into it, the suggestions for baby blanket (sweet) are good – and my bestest Chicago chum just reported in as 6 weeks preggers. Another thought: you could use it to cover a cheap-ass flower pot that you use to store gardening utensils…. Thematically appropriate and somehow gardening gear gets a free pass on cute.

  34. goodyoneshoe says:

    On closer examination… is the lilac-ish square a winged vulva? I sense a little Georgia O’Keefe at the Art Institutue influence on the pattern maker….

  35. judy says:

    i think it would make a charming tea cozy…

  36. S.Kate says:

    I would either crop the panel to use the 4 x 5 square area cornered by the blue flowers along with canvas as a hip-to-be square mod spring/summer tote

    or

    I would crop the panel from chartreuse daisy side as a 4 high by 7 wide rectangular throw pillow backed with baby blue cotton velvet with a piped edging of same.

    If you have no attachment to or plans to continue or alter this masterpiece, may I tempt you with something from my stash as a trade?

  37. Jamie says:

    Obviously you were into flowers at one time, and also have a penchant for wrapping inanimate objects with knitting, how about a flowerpot cozy?

  38. Linda says:

    I see a pillow. A wonderful, spring anytime of year, pillow. Use a soft,velvety material for the backing and stuff with soft cooshy stuffing and cuddle up with coco and a (matching, but you would need to find the pattern) afghan in the middle of January. What could be better?

  39. scribblearts says:

    Oi.

    A gameboard?
    The cover of a jewelry roll?
    Cut it up into 2 block by 2 block pincushion tops?
    Simple backpack with a top gathered by drawstring/straps?
    Knit graffiti?
    Pet sweater?

  40. Penny says:

    I also vote for a throw pillow. Is it bad for the early 90’s to feel retro?

  41. Karin says:

    Hi,

    I was thinking a spring bag would be great.

    Karin

  42. nat says:

    how about the central panel for a baby blanket with a wide cotton lacy border knit sideways around?

  43. Isobel says:

    How about a bath mat??!!

  44. Cyndy says:

    How about offering it to someone who will wear it?

  45. Deb says:

    Ummmmmmmmmm. How about folding it in half and making a bag out of it??? A pair of funky handles, a bit of embroidery or beading on the flowers, a fabric lining-bada boom, bada bing! A summer purse! (and I think I HAVE that pattern somewhere- if you wanted it!)

  46. joan says:

    I’m going to say something mean. I’d frog it, save the cream cotton for another project, and leave all the other unpicked intarsia bits out for the birds to build nests with next spring….

  47. jenifleur says:

    I’d bind the edges and use it as a table centerpiece with a vase of mixed flowers on top of it.

  48. amberdiel says:

    It looks perfect for a baby…I’d rip that last row of squares back, probably the ribbing, too, put an edging on all around, and gift as a lovely changing pad or burp cloth. Moms can never have too many of those!

  49. Pam says:

    I think the most likely uses would be a pillow or a bag. If the “print” doesn’t suit you, pass it on to someone who likes to decorate with florals or chintz.

  50. elisabeth says:

    Do not frog it! Frame it or otherwise make it a piece of wall or door art.

    And please, let me know when you are coming to NYC for I would LOVE to finally meet you in person and say “hello.”

 
 
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